What guns are banned in Canada?

 

Be prepared for the inundation of illogic .  You have been warned.

This is probably the most common question for people who are thinking about either moving to Canada or just visiting for a hunting trip, shooting competition, or other sort of vacation.  Sadly, the truth of the matter is that there is little or no rhyme or reason to the pattern of firearm prohibitions in Canada and, as such, YOU CANNOT RELY ON COMMON SENSE TO BE YOUR GUIDE IN THIS MATTER!!  We cannot stress that enough…

As idiotic as it may seem, Canadian politicians and lawmakers have long since stopped listening to responsible gun owners and other genuinely knowledgeable people on the subject and have been simply giving the gun-grabbers what they want, no matter how ridiculous it may be.

The following information (with commentary added where we felt it appropriate) was taken, word for word, from the Canada Firearms Centre (CFC) website on 27 September 2008.  It is important to note that date because, due to the sometimes-nebulous nature of Canadian gun law, the status of any weapon can change at any time — even without any debate in the Canadian Parliament!  You will notice below many references to “Orders in Council” (OICs).  These are declarations — indeed, changes to the very law of the land! — that are enacted, not by elected representatives of the Canadian people, but rather by unelected bureaucratic bodies who are, for all intents and purposes, accountable to NO ONE!  It is even possible for a perfectly law-abiding Canadian gun owner to become a criminal without his knowledge, if one of his firearms is suddenly added to the prohibited list and he is not aware and he does not jump through the right bureaucratic hoops.  This is the sad state of affairs in Canada today.

Because of this, you are strongly advised, if you have any questions, uncertainties or doubts whatsoever, to contact the Canada Firearms Centre (CFC) or local Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) detachment for ANY clarifications that you may require.  The following information is presented for general reference only!

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All information past this point is taken directly from the CFC website and is presented in its original form.  All footnotes are commentary by the staff of GunOwnersResource.com and are not in any way a reflection of official Canadian Government positions on the matters in question.
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There are three categories of firearms for purposes of Canadian law:

  • non-restricted,[1]
  • restricted, and
  • prohibited.

This fact sheet identifies which firearms are restricted or prohibited, as set out in the Criminal Code and the Criminal Code Regulations. Some firearms are classified on the bases of their physical characteristics, such as barrel length or type of action; others are specified by make and model.

Non-restricted firearms are any rifles and shotguns that are neither restricted nor prohibited. Most common long guns are non-restricted, but there are a few exceptions, as indicated in this fact sheet.

Definition of a Restricted Firearm

According to the Criminal Code, a restricted firearm is:

  • a handgun that is not a prohibited firearm;
  • a semi-automatic, centre-fire rifle or shotgun with a barrel length less than 470 mm (18.5 inches) that is not prohibited;
  • a rifle or shotgun that can fire when its overall length is reduced by folding, telescoping or some other means to less than 660 mm (26 inches);
  • any firearm prescribed as restricted (including some long guns).

Firearms Prescribed as Restricted

This list of restricted firearms specified in the December 1, 1998 Criminal Code regulations includes all firearms that have been restricted by a former Order in Council.

• The firearms of the designs commonly known as the High Standard Model 10, Series A shotgun and the High Standard Model 10, Series B shotgun, and any variants or modified versions of them.

• The firearm of the design commonly known as the M-16 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the:

  1. Colt AR-15;
  2. Colt AR-15 SPI;
  3. Colt AR-15 Sporter;
  4. Colt AR-15 Collapsible Stock Model;
  5. Colt AR-15 A2;
  6. Colt AR-15 A2 Carbine;
  7. Colt AR-15 A2 Government Model Rifle;
  8. Colt AR-15 A2 Government Model Target Rifle;
  9. Colt AR-15 A2 Government Model Carbine;
  10. Colt AR-15 A2 Sporter II;
  11. Colt AR-15 A2 H-BAR;
  12. Colt AR-15 A2 Delta H-BAR;
  13. Colt AR-15 A2 Delta H-BAR Match;
  14. Colt AR-15 9mm Carbine;
  15. Armalite AR-15;
  16. AAI M15;
  17. AP74;
  18. EAC J-15;
  19. PWA Commando;
  20. SGW XM15A;
  21. SGW CAR-AR;
  22. SWD AR-15; and,
  23. Any 22 calibre rimfire variant, including the:[2]
    1. Mitchell M-16A-1/22,
    2. Mitchell M-16/22,
    3. Mitchell CAR-15/22, and
    4. AP74 Auto Rifle.

Definition of a Prohibited Firearm

The Criminal Code states that a prohibited firearm is:

  • a handgun with a barrel length of 105 mm (4.1 inches) or less;
  • a handgun designed or adapted to discharge 25 or 32 calibre ammunition;
  • a rifle or shotgun that has been altered to make it less than 660 mm (26 inches) in overall length;
  • a rifle or shotgun that has been altered to make the barrel length less than 457 mm (18 inches) where the overall firearm length is 660 mm (26 inches) or more;
  • an automatic firearm and a converted automatic firearm;
  • any firearm prescribed as prohibited.

* Exceptions to the Prohibited Firearm Definition

Certain handguns for use in international sporting competitions are excluded from the prohibition affecting the short-barreled and 25 or 32 calibre handguns. These handguns therefore are considered restricted firearms under the Criminal Code. These handguns are the:

Make Model Calibre
1. Benelli MP 90 S 32 S&W Long
2. Domino OP 601 22 Short
3. Erma ESP 85 A 32 S&W Long
4. FAS CF 603 32 S&W Long
5. FAS 601 22 Short
6. Hammerli-Walther 201 22 Short
7. Hammerli-Walther 202 22 Short
8. Hammerli 230 22 Short
9. Hammerli 230-1 22 Short
10. Hammerli 230-2 22 Short
11. Hammerli 232 22 Short
12. Hammerli 280 32 S&W Long
13. Hammerli P240 32 S&W Long
14. Hammerli SP-20 22 LR
15. Hammerli SP-20 32 S&W Long
16. High Standard Olympic 22 Short
17. Manurhin MR 32 Match 32 S&W Long
18. Pardini GP 22 Short
19. Pardini GP Schumann 22 Short
20. Pardini HP 32 S&W Long
21. Pardini MP 32 S&W Long
22. Sako 22-32 22 Short
23. Sako 22-32 22 LR
24. Sako 22-32 32 S&W Long
25. Sako Tri-Ace 22 Short
26. Sako Tri-Ace 22 LR
27. Sako Tri-Ace 32 S&W Long
28. Unique DES 69 22 LR
29. Unique VO 79 22 Short
30. Unique DES 32 U 32 S&W Long
31. Vostok TOZ 96 32 S&W Long
32. Walther GSP 22 LR
33. Walther GSP 22 Short
34. Walther GSP 32 S&W Long
35. Walther OSP 22 LR
36. Walther OSP 22 Short
37. Walther OSP 32 S&W Long

Firearms Prescribed as Prohibited

As with restricted firearms, a Criminal Code regulation listing all the firearms previously prohibited by Order in Council came into effect December 1, 1998. Those firearms are:

Former Prohibited Weapons Order No. 3

  • Any firearm capable of discharging a dart or other object carrying an electrical current or substance, including the firearm of the design commonly known as the Taser Public Defender and any variant or modified version of it.

Former Prohibited Weapons Order No. 8

  • The firearm known as the SSS-1 Stinger and any similar firearm designed or of a size to fit in the palm of the hand.

Former Prohibited Weapons Order No. 11

  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Franchi SPAS-12 shotgun, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Franchi LAW 12 shotgun.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Striker shotgun, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Striker 12 shotgun and the Streetsweeper shotgun.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the USAS-12 Auto Shotgun, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Franchi SPAS-15 shotgun, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Benelli M1 Super 90 shotgun and the Benelli M3 Super 90 shotgun, and any variants or modified versions of them, with the exception of the:
    1. M1 Super 90 Field;
    2. M1 Super 90 Sporting Special;
    3. Montefeltro Super 90;
    4. Montefeltro Super 90 Standard Hunter;
    5. Montefeltro Super 90 Left Hand;
    6. Montefeltro Super 90 Turkey;
    7. Montefeltro Super 90 Uplander;
    8. Montefeltro Super 90 Slug;
    9. Montefeltro Super 90 20 Gauge;
    10. Black Eagle;
    11. Black Eagle Limited Edition;
    12. Black Eagle Competition;
    13. Black Eagle Slug Gun;
    14. Super Black Eagle; and
    15. Super Black Eagle Custom Slug.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Bernardelli B4 shotgun and the Bernardelli B4/B shotgun, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the American 180 Auto Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it, including the AM-180 Auto Carbine and the Illinois Arms Company Model 180 Auto Carbine.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Barrett “Light Fifty” Model 82A1 rifle and the Barrett Model 90 rifle, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Calico M-900 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the M-951 carbine, M-100 carbine and M-105 carbine.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Iver Johnson AMAC long-range rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the McMillan M87 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the McMillan M87R rifle and the McMillan M88 carbine.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Pauza Specialties P50 rifle and P50 carbine, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Encom MK-IV carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Encom MP-9 and MP-45 carbines, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the FAMAS rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the MAS 223, FAMAS Export, FAMAS Civil and Mitchell MAS/22.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Feather AT-9 Semi-Auto Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Feather AT-22 Auto Carbine.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Federal XC-450 Auto Rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Federal XC-900 rifle and Federal XC-220 rifle.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Gepard long-range sniper rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Heckler and Koch (HK) Model G11 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Research Armament Industries (RAI) Model 500 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Spectre Auto Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the US Arms PMAI “Assault” 22 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Weaver Arms Nighthawk Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the A.A. Arms AR9 Semi-Automatic Rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Claridge HI-TEC C, LEC-9 and ZLEC-9 carbines, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Kimel Industries AR-9 rifle or carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Grendel R-31 Auto Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Maadi Griffin Rifle and the Maadi Griffin Carbine, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the AA Arms Model AR-9 carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Bushmaster Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Calico M-950 Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the M-110 pistol.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Encom MK-IV assault pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Encom MP-9 and MP-45 assault pistols, and any variants or modified versions of them, including the Encom MP-9 and MP-45 mini pistols.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Federal XP-450 Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the XP-900 Auto Pistol.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Heckler and Koch (HK) SP89 Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Intratec Tec-9 Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Tec-9S, Tec-9M, Tec-9MS, and any semi-automatic variants of them, including the Tec-DC9, Tec-DC9M, Tec-9A, Tec-Scorpion, Tec-22T and Tec-22TN.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Iver Johnson Enforcer Model 3000 Auto Pistol and the Iver Johnson Plainfield Super Enforcer Carbine, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Skorpion Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Spectre Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Sterling Mk 7 pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Sterling Mk 7 C4 and Sterling Mk 7 C8.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Universal Enforcer Model 3000 Auto Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Universal Enforcer Model 3010N, Model 3015G, Model 3020TRB and Model 3025TCO Carbines.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the US Arms PMAIP “Assault” 22 pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Goncz High-Tech Long Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Claridge Hi-Tec models S, L, T, ZL-9 and ZT-9 pistols.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Leader Mark 5 Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the OA-93 assault pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the A.A. Arms AP9 Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Patriot pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the XM 231S pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the A1, A2 and A3 Flattop pistols.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the AA Arms Model AP-9 pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Target AP-9 and the Mini AP-9 pistols.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Kimel Industries AP-9 pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Grendel P-30, P-30 M, P-30 L and P-31 pistols, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Claridge HI-TEC ZL-9, HI-TEC S, HI-TEC L, HI-TEC T, HI-TEC ZT-9 and HI-TEC ZL-9 pistols, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Steyr SPP Assault Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Maadi Griffin Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Interdynamics KG-99 Assault Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.

Former Prohibited Weapons Order No. 12 (in effect since October 1, 1992)

  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Sterling Mk 6 Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Steyr AUG rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the UZI carbine, and any variant or modified version of it, including the UZI Model A carbine and the Mini-UZI carbine.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the Ingram M10 and M11 pistols, and any variants or modified versions of them, including the Cobray M10 and M11 pistols, the RPB M10, M11, SM10 and SM11 pistols and the SWD M10, M11, SM10 and SM11 pistols.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Partisan Avenger Auto Pistol, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the UZI pistol, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Micro-UZI pistol.

Former Prohibited Weapons Order No. 13 (in effect since January 1, 1995)

  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the AK-47 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it except for the Valmet Hunter, the Valmet Hunter Auto and the Valmet M78 rifles, but including the:

(a) AK-74;
(b) AK Hunter;
(c) AKM;
(d) AKM-63;
(e) AKS-56S;
(f) AKS-56S-1;
(g) AKS-56S-2;
(h) AKS-74;
(i) AKS-84S-1;
(j) AMD-65;
(k) AR Model .223;
(l) Dragunov;
(m) Galil;
(n) KKMPi69;
(o) M60;
(p) M62;
(q) M70B1;
(r) M70AB2;
(s) M76;
(t) M77B1;
(u) M78;
(v) M80;
(w) M80A;
(x) MAK90;
(y) MPiK;
(z) MPiKM;
(z.1) MPiKMS-72;
(z.2) MPiKS;
(z.3) PKM;
(z.4) PKM-DGN-60;
(z.5) PMKM;
(z.6) RPK;
(z.7) RPK-74;
(z.8) RPK-87S;
(z.9) Type 56;
(z.10) Type 56-1;
(z.11) Type 56-2;
(z.12) Type 56-3;
(z.13) Type 56-4;
(z.14) Type 68;
(z.15) Type 79;
(z.16) American Arms AKY39;
(z.17) American Arms AKF39;
(z.18) American Arms AKC47;
(z.19) American Arms AKF47;
(z.20) MAM70WS762;
(z.21) MAM70FS762;
(z.22) Mitchell AK-22;
(z.23) Mitchell AK-47;
(z.24) Mitchell Heavy Barrel AK-47;
(z.25) Norinco 84S;
(z.26) Norinco 84S AK;
(z.27) Norinco 56;
(z.28) Norinco 56-1;
(z.29) Norinco 56-2;
(z.30) Norinco 56-3;
(z.31) Norinco 56-4;
(z.32) Poly Technologies Inc. AK-47/S;
(z.33) Poly Technologies Inc. AKS-47/S;
(z.34) Poly Technologies Inc. AKS-762;
(z.35) Valmet M76;
(z.36) Valmet M76 carbine;
(z.37) Valmet M78/A2;
(z.38) Valmet M78 (NATO) LMG;
(z.39) Valmet M82; and
(z.40) Valmet M82 Bullpup.

  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Armalite AR-180 Sporter carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Beretta AR70 assault rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the BM 59 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including:
    1. the Beretta
      1. BM 59,
      2. BM 59R,
      3. BM 59GL,
      4. BM 59D,
      5. BM 59 Mk E,
      6. BM 59 Mk I,
      7. BM 59 Mk Ital,
      8. BM 59 Mk II,
      9. BM 59 Mk III,
      10. BM 59 Mk Ital TA,
      11. BM 59 Mk Ital Para,
      12. BM 59 Mk Ital TP, and
      13. BM 60CB; and
    2. the Springfield Armory
      1. BM 59 Alpine,
      2. BM 59 Alpine Paratrooper, and
      3. BM 59 Nigerian Mk IV.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Bushmaster Auto Rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Cetme Sport Auto Rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Daewoo K1 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Daewoo K1A1, K2, Max 1, Max 2, AR-100, AR 110C, MAXI-II and KC-20.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Demro TAC-1M carbine, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Demro XF-7 Wasp Carbine.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Eagle Apache Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the FN-FNC rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the FNC Auto Rifle, FNC Auto Paratrooper, FNC-11, FNC-22 and FNC-33.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the FN-FAL (FN-LAR) rifle, and any variant or modified version of it[3] , including the FN 308 Model 44, FN-FAL (FN-LAR) Competition Auto, FN-FAL (FN-LAR) Heavy Barrel 308 Match, FN-FAL (FN-LAR) Paratrooper 308 Match 50-64 and FN 308 Model 50-63.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the G3 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the Heckler and Koch:
    1. HK 91;
    2. HK 91A2;
    3. HK 91A3;
    4. HK G3 A3;
    5. HK G3 A3 ZF;
    6. HK G3 A4;
    7. HK G3 SG/1; and
    8. HK PSG1.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Galil assault rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the AP-84, Galil ARM, Galil AR, Galil SAR, Galil 332 and Mitchell Galil/22 Auto Rifle.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Goncz High-Tech Carbine, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Heckler and Koch HK 33 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the:
    1. HK 33A2;
    2. HK 33A3;
    3. HK 33KA1;
    4. HK 93;
    5. HK 93A2; and
    6. HK 93A3.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the J & R Eng M-68 carbine, and any variant or modified version of it, including the PJK M-68 and the Wilkinson Terry carbine.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Leader Mark Series Auto Rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the MP5 submachine gun and MP5 carbine, and any variants or modified versions of them, including the Heckler and Koch:
    1. HK MP5;
    2. HK MP5A2;
    3. HK MP5A3;
    4. HK MP5K;
    5. HK MP5SD;
    6. HK MP5SD1;
    7. HK MP5SD2;
    8. HK MP5SD3;
    9. HK 94;
    10. HK 94A2; and,
    11. HK 94A3.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the PE57 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearms of the designs commonly known as the SG-550 rifle and SG-551 carbine, and any variants or modified versions of them.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the SIG AMT rifle, and any variant or modified version of it.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Springfield Armory SAR-48 rifle, and any variant or modified version of it, including the SAR-48 Bush, SAR-48 Heavy Barrel, SAR-48 Para and SAR-48 Model 22.
  • The firearm of the design commonly known as the Thompson submachine gun, and any variant or modified version of it, including the:
    1. Thompson Model 1921;
    2. Thompson Model 1927;
    3. Thompson Model 1928;
    4. Thompson Model M1;
    5. Auto-Ordnance M27A-1;
    6. Auto-Ordnance M27A-1 Deluxe;
    7. Auto-Ordnance M1927A-3;
    8. Auto-Ordnance M1927A-5;
    9. Auto-Ordnance Thompson M1;
    10. Commando Arms Mk I;
    11. Commando Arms Mk II;
    12. Commando Arms Mk III;
    13. Commando Arms Mk 9; and,
    14. Commando Arms Mk 45.

Information

For more information, contact the Canada Firearms Centre.

This fact sheet is intended to provide general information only. For legal references, please refer to the Firearms Act and its regulations.

Provincial, territorial and municipal laws, regulations and policies may also apply.

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All information past this point is commentary by the staff of GunOwnersResource.com and is not in any way a reflection of official Canadian Government positions on the matters in question.
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  • [note 1] Bear in mind that, just because something is “non-restricted,” does NOT mean that you can have it!  Under Canadian law, NO ONE can possess ANY firearm without government authorization.  You can’t even buy a box of .22LR without a Possession and Acquisition License.
  • [note 2] Yes, they’re .22s and no, there isn’t any difference at all in functionality between them and a Ruger 10/22.  And yes, they’re banned anyway.  Go figure.
  • [note 3] That’s right: the FNC1 (standard issue for the Canadian Armed Forces for decades) is a “variant” of the FN FAL/LAR.  They banned the Army’s old rifle.

  91 Responses to “What guns are banned in Canada?”

  1. Can a visitor purchase rifle parts for Remignton 700 bolt action, such as stock/chassis, magazines, trigger etc and carry them back to his native country?
    Is any licensing required for these parts?

  2. I have my pal and am looking to buy a henry lever action 22 caliber rifle. Is that perfectly fine to own in London Ontario Canada?

  3. I was thinking of the same point, a lot of stuff that I noticed our friends to the north will ban, but then allow in other cases (with a different cartridge logo/name/designation), is actually the same projectile. Maybe minimally different ballistic characteristics.

    I’ll never figure out your “assault weapon” ban (nor California’s for that matter). A 62 grain 5.56mm round from an AR-15 will carry about 1305 ft-lb of energy. My ultra light Browning X-Bolt using a 200 grain projectile will deliver 4100 ft-lb of energy at the same distance.

    It started with “full auto” rapid fire being the enemy of life as we know it, then it was single fire semi-automatic, and we all know they are coming for the bolt action rifles next when the bans don’t meet their perceived objective of changing the nature of humanity.

    Never mind that the vast majority of crime and murder is committed with a handgun, its pretty much single-digit percentages with a rifle or shotgun (of any kind). Far be it from arguing with leftist emotions with actual facts though…

    • Note that the Columbine shooting used automatic weapons, the attack on the marine recruiting center used automatic weapons, and the shooting at the batman movie used automatic weapons. Maybe we just have enough sense not to let civilians have high power weapons that fire ten plus rounds per second.

      • Lol none of those were auto firearms. Semi-auto yes but not automatic

      • Yeah don’t bother, liberals don’t know there’s a difference between automatic and semi-auto and they choose not to.

      • LOL. Moron. Those are semi-auto’s.

        And out of 350 million people, the criminal use of ANY long rifle in the US is less than 5% of crime (shotguns, hunting rifles, “assault” rifles, etc.). Over 90% is with a handgun and more murders are actually with a baseball bat.

        So, true, I can probably fire 2-3 rounds per second (with zero accuracy) with my AR-15, with a 55 grain projectile at about 2000 feet per second, versus my 300 Win Mag at a 180 grain projectile and about 4000 feet per second… off the cuff, I’m throwing 600% more force per round with the 300 Win Mag, so it should be relatively irrelevant that I can only fire it once every 2 or 3 seconds. Nonetheless, I would also hit more often with the 300 and it’s a 500 yard rifle, not a 150 yard rifle like an AR.

        I don’t even prefer to shoot the AR, between the bullet-button, and the constant jams from the mil surplus 5.56 Tula ammo I buy for that thing, its kind of about as much fun as a snow mobile (and if you have a snow mobile, you know what I mean). 30 seconds of adrenaline followed by 30 minutes of digging it out of a snow bank.

        My High Point .45 carbine is by far the best choice, cheap little $80 holographic scope, and you point & shoot – you won’t hit with 1″ groups with that thing, but you will pepper the target without a lot of effort.

  4. I’ll be hunting in 2017 in British Columbia, I’ll be bringing a Browning X-Bolt .300 Win Mag with a 3-round detachable magazine (bolt-action), I’m assuming I’m good?

  5. The US statistics (from the Federal Bureau of Investigation) also include suicides, which are not generally reported in many other countries. If someone can’t shoot themselves, but can’t get a firearm, bridges, cars, etc. are going to be plan b. Nor do our statistics separate out justifiable homicide.

    Nonetheless, I think the ‘jist’ of the conversation is about firearms and crime and gun control of what everyone is talking about in the way of AR-15s, etc. Only 11.7% of ALL reported gun incidents are committed with a rifle. 9.7% with shotguns, and the remainder are handguns of various types.

    Since homicides and various assaults including something like a non-criminal hunting accident, some of the rifle & shotgun incidents might just be hunting accidents, I can’t discern that from here, or, if its following an aggravating family gathering, maybe something less than accidental.

    Nonetheless, its a difficult statistic to compare because the US ones are so detailed, Canada is probably mature as well, but who knows with Mexico & whatever.

    Doesn’t matter anyway, we soundly defeated the “progressive” leftists, the Scalia seat on SCOTUS will be replaced with Ted Cruz or a similar constitutionist, and at least 3 other lefties will be gone as well in the next 4 years. 36 states are now completely run by Republican governments. Clinton carried ONLY 56 out of 3,084 voting precincts in the United States.

    My sympathies to our friends across the border, and I’m looking forward to my Roosevelt Elk Hunt coming up in a year or so in British Columbia, but at least on our side of the border, virtually all “gun control” is going to be pushed back to the strict reading of the Second Amendment. (The voters have spoken).

  6. The hilarious thing is the “big gun” comments, probably eluding to an AR15. An AR15 from a range, take-down / energy / inertia, and nearly every measurable perspective is just not a very powerful firearm. The caliber was designed to take an enemy off the battlefield, primarily from incapacitation, rather than termination, because of America’s preference politically to reduce casualties.

    Any big game rifle is certainly more powerful, and more accurate.

    The reason for sporting popularity of AR15s and other sporting rifles is
    a.) they are popular and

    b.) they are excellent for use at the range because they are not as sensitive to heat from firing all day as a hunting rifle (which can easily become inaccurate after 10 or 20 rounds are fired).

    The left & media’s illusion that being of a simple stamped-metal construction and painted black makes them ‘more powerful’ is quite laughable to anyone that knows anything about firearms. A .223 is, well, a .22 caliber round with a bit more velocity to it. It is, ultimately, a very small round and rather lower-average in its capability.

  7. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, but reality is based on facts. Gun control limits the law abiding owner, not a murderer. Guns are always accessible, if the people think that a misdemeanor gun charge is going to stop someone from 50 murders in your example, it’s laughable.

    Convicted felons in the US cannot buy a firearm, yet always have them. Ghost guns are made all over the world, primarily in huts in Philppines and sold cheaper on the street than I can buy one over the counter for. Being small, easy to put in with the tractor and auto parts in the millions of containers landed annually.

    Chicago is completely banned from firearms, yet about 56 shootings per weekend.

    Statistics of comparing Canada to the US are meaningless, it’s about 25 million people compared to 400 million. The US is actually about average for gun violence and about lower than average if suicide is deleted. Mexico is far higher, and guns are banned there. Honduras and Nicaragua are 2500% of US per capita, yet guns are illegal there.

    If you can’t buy a gun, you can make one, I can easily build a musket with my tools and skills at home. I built my AR with purchased parts, any of which I could either buy at a hardware store or build using downloaded schematics and a CNC machine.

    Ammo is incredibly easy to manufacture, even on a large scale, at home.

    The lefties need to get out of their coffee shops, spend some time with real people and understand conservation, wildlife management, home defense if the police are not 3 minutes away, and realize that laws are kind of meaningless on the topic anyway.

  8. I’m not entirely sure why the Canadian Government is so afraid of a law abiding tax paying citizen with any type of weapon they choose?If your a contributing member of society have a sound mind your not likely to commit any crimes.Unless of course your a Politician then you
    are free to misuse your power embezzle money from the Taxpayers Hmm now i see. LOL

    • I am Canadian and love the country. I do not see why we can’t shoot restricted weapons on our own yards even if we have 20 acres, but our US neighbors have a little to much freedom being able to own and use automatic weapons. The issue for them is if the tighten up the gun laws it’ll turn out like Australia with a much higher crime rate. Remember, the only people that won’t obey the laws are the criminals and that makes it worse for the law abiding ones!!

  9. Well said, I heard a fellow Canadian say the other day how lucky we are to have a Queen. That’s the kind of Servant complex alot of Canadians have. Remember who serves who. With the rediculous amount of taxes, licenses and insurance rates, I don’t pay my servants to tell me I can’t be trusted with an object, all the while they’re selling weapons to the Saudi Government, the shining light when it comes to treating people with dignity…pfft.

    • I’m a gun owner and im Canadian and i have to say that if everyone was responsible enough to own a gun then sure why not…but the facts are not everyone is responsible and it only takes a second to go from “responsible” to “murderer”. If you think only criminals use guns to kill then you are ignorant of the facts….what are you all so afraid of that you need to own bigger weapons….i dont need to and i question the reasoning of anyone who does….if the reason is at all because you just want the power of it….

      • Yeah that’s why we have licencing, background checks, checks with spouses before issuing a PAL, etc. Will you catch everyone, no. The current system didn’t stop the guy who shot the reservist in Ottawa (stole the gun used from someone else) nor the guy who drove over the soldier in Quebec (look at that a murder with no gun used). You don’t legislate for the unpredictable. If you are that concerned about going from responsible to murderer maybe you should turn in your own firearms.
        It isn’t about “bigger weapons”, it’s about a reasoned and legitimate discussion as the basis for legislation and law. With a stroke of an administrative pen the RCMP can make hundreds of law-abiding citizens criminals using little more than their “preference” to get guns out of the hands of those dirty civilians (look at the recent decision regarding 10/22 magazines). BTW hope you don’t won any of those magazines you filthy criminal.

      • You seem to lack the understanding of the conversation. Its not about bigger. Example. I banned from owning a particular 50cal sniper in single shot bolt, also banned from owning another bullpup mag fed. But I can buy a semiauto bullpup mag fed non-restricted. Our laws unfortunately are made by order in council by poorly trained government officials.

  10. Christ, they’ve even banned the EKOL Jackal Dual (it fires blanks/isn’t a firearm, so you don’t need any license to buy/own) because it can fire in automatic. I’ve also heard that basically any gun that fires blanks and resemblesan existing model of firearm is now prohibited too (apparently the Dual Jackal came with a flre attachment for the barrel, so it got by from a “signal gun” loophole, which they closed a few years ago).

    That’s pathetic…I could at least own a prop of a gun I’m not allowed to buy for real and at least simulate the feel/experience of auto-fire, but adult cap-guns are apparently a massive threat/dangerous to the public. I CAN, however, buy an all-metal WWII .50Cal LMG Airsoft replica (complete with realistic metal working action/slide as well as ammo drum in same manner, and it actually launches a projectile, which technically makes it a firearm). How fucking stupid is that?!?

  11. I looked up this post today after discussing a school shooting that happened in Saskatchewan yesterday. We were talking about restricted guns in Canada. When I brought this article up I couldn’t believe what I was reading at the top. I am a proud Canadian and think it’s the greatest country in the world to live in, it’s not perfect, but where is. I am still in shock when I hear a lot of Americans talking about their right to bare arms and how things should stay the same. There seems to be this insane idea in the U.S. that the only way to stop gun violence is with more guns. I can’t believe there is as much opposition to Obama’s new gun control laws as there has been. I am not opposed to people owning guns or hunting or anything like that, I have many friends and family that do own guns. But they don’t own guns for protection and keep them in their night stands, they use them for hunting, that’s it. That is why the laws are the way they are in Canada. What does anyone need an assault rifle or a semi or even fully automatic weapon for? Having tighter gun control laws isn’t a bad thing, it’s about trying to protect people. Remember that it’s not guns that kill people, it’s stupid PEOPLE with guns that kill people. Having a stronger screening process for getting a gun can only be a good thing for America, and maybe having a list of some banned weapons like we do here is Canada might be a good idea as well. It has always boggled my mind that in the States I can walk into Walmart and a short while later walk out with an assault rifle, ammunition, and a 12 pack of beer. Something doesn’t seem right with that.

    • And yet that 12 pack of beer is responsible for more deaths than guns. Alcohol, it’s not childs play. You know anybody can walk into a hardware store and buy everything needed to make a bomb with no hassle. There will always be people trying to kill others. Trying to affect a criminal, while noble is not working, we must empower the victims to defend themselves, while making punishment for those who commit violent crimes alot harsher.

    • Hi Dave.
      Americans have the right to own guns. Not the right to bare arms without a permit. Rights and laws differ from state to state. They have much less restrictions on the guns they have the right to own. That is a fact. Another fact is , it is not the average jo guy, who goes and commits all kind of non sense gun bulshit violence. And those who do, don’t take the time to register their guns. So, laws only penalise the law obiding citizen. The real criminals are not registering their guns. The registration is a tax on gun ownership. That’s it.

      Canadians and Americans don’t see government the same way. To Canadians, government is big daddy. Big daddy will solve all problems, big daddy will look after the people no matter what. etc. and this vision is soooo far from reality. Americans don’t want big daddy. They want the freedom to do their own thing.

      For an American , guns are not just for hunting. The USA became the USA when they became free from England after the war of independence. So how did they get their freedom? They earned it! Some Americans never forgot that part of history.
      From a British colony it became an independent republic.

      Canada is a constitutional monarchy. Who is the monarch? The queen of England. . Not the same thing at all. Canadians have very little to say in terms of anything.

      Americans,they can fight back legally because their constitution gives them the right to bare arms and to fight tyranny coming from the government. Americans do not see government as big daddy. They see it as something that must be kept in check, so government will not take away the rights of the people. They do not want a government that will dictate what the people can and cannot do, from sun up to sun down. They want good governance. They believe in being able to respond to violence with fire power. And it works. They don’t want violence. They just want the power to defend themselves , their family, and their country. They don’t want to ask permission to do this. Their attitude is, as long as me American person, am following the law and being a good guy causing no arm , and minding my own business , I can do what I want. They see themselves as free people and want to remain free, That is the difference.

      • nit pick- most of the worlds people have the right to bare arms, however in Canada they do restrict the right to bear arms.

      • Hi Bibi…Canadians have always wanted the same treatment and respect and to live free from Tyranny from the Government as our American cousins. “To live free or die” has been mankind’s sworn oath no matter where he dragged his knuckles. Canadians carry a good many of the same laws on Firearm ownership,entitlement,transporting,usage and on and on with the line being drawn at two words,”The right” vs “The Privilege” We like to think of ourselves as so different from them but at the end of the day it’s still one pant leg being pulled off …

      • Hi Bibi. I’m not going to try to convince you of anything because that’s not realistic but I just wanted to say that Canadians are not all incredibly loyal to the government. For me, it’s more that I don’t believe owning a gun would help me defend myself against the government anyway. If they wanted to come to my house and kill me, I’m sure that they would be trained much better than I am, and have things that I don’t have access to that would overpower any gun any day. I just feel as though giving access to guns to everyone is only giving the stupid, mentally unstable, and psychopathic an easier way to get a weapon. Anyone can walk into a hardware store and make a bomb but that takes skill, time, and intelligence. On the other hand, having things like gun shows in which you can simply purchase a gun no questions asked means that you can buy one without the effort. Also, if guns were more controlled and such, though there are other weapons mass shootings would be harder to replicate. It’s not as easy to kill 50 people with a knife. That’s just my opinion.

      • The global Powers That Shouldn’t Be want to strip down, nation by nation, our rights to bear arms, not because they fear the threat of our pea-shooters against their armed forces and militarized police, but because they simply hate the attitude that bearing of arms is an inalienable right. BTW they also hate democracy and are wearing it down globally by attrition with the power of their filthy money. Soros, Rockefeller etc. Reference how they are strangling the western democratic powers by money manipulation and forced immigration. Nations are being systematically raped of their sovereignty. TPT(SN)B are determined to, in the words of Queen Hillary, to “bring us to heel.”

      • There are people (like me) that love firearms as for any other sport. We love the feeling of shooting a gun, the satisfaction of that bullet hitting your target. People that do not like guns (like you) will never understand that love for firearms. Oh and Emily by the way ever heard of a firearm license ? Yeah well you need one of these to purchase a gun, so the process is not so simple. They also check your mental state when you get this license.

      • Incorrect. “The Right to Keep and Bear Arms Shall Not Be Infringed”. Kind of hard to dispute the language.

        The left will try to somehow mix the previous clause in the Second Amendment to indicate that only applies to a “Well Regulated Militia”, but that is the incorrect interpretation.

        “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

        It doesn’t say the right of the “militia” to keep and bear arms, it says the right of the “People”.

        The Second Amendment to the Constitution was specifically designed to enable the people to protect themselves from an over-reaching government, or as self-defense against a ‘militia”. Prior to the Revolution, King George quartered troops in American homes and required the colonists to feed and provide for them. This was one of the most contentious topics that led to the Declaration of Independence.

        The clause states that the framers of the Constitution knew that it was necessary to a free and functioning society to possess and retain a standing army (militia) necessary to defend the states from invaders, and very accurately foresaw the War of 1812 when England tried to retake the American colonies (and the only disagreement we have really ever had with our neighbors to the north). The understanding the framers had was that it was necessary to have a standing Army and Navy to defend the United States, but that the People would also have the right to possess the means to defend themselves.

        We can also easily extend the fact that every one of the framers would have probably had a side-arm or a musket with them on their horse and carriage travels to and from Philadelphia and most certainly would have had one to provide food for their families. Owning a firearm was certainly not a foreign concept.

        Firearms to the American public have really never been about self-defense, its been about sustenance at times and for some, and as a warranty against ever being oppressed again. Even Tojo laughed at the suggestion by the Japanese Emperor and Hitler to open a land-based amphibious attack on the West Coast of the United States, he said very truthfully, “this isn’t about fighting a few hundred thousand soldiers, this would be about fighting 200 million armed citizens on their own soil and defending their own homes.”

        America’s history is very different from Canada’s. While there is no greater special relationship between countries than that which exists between the US, UK, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia, we did cast off that bondage and servitude. It is indeed what makes us very different, and although we are 99.99% in solid support and agreement with our closest allies, with no chance that would ever be anything different, it is very necessary for our Canadian friends to understand and respect that difference.

        There are many other reasons Americans obviously own our 1 billion+ firearms, and there is certainly a lot of misunderstanding about it. For example, we can’t buy fully automatic rifles, carbines, or handguns like I see mentioned here. There are some that legally exist, prior to the Assault Weapons Ban in 60’s… but on the rare occasion one of those does come up for sale, we’re not talking Saturday Night Special prices… we’re looking at $50,000 for a non-functioning one up to $100,000+… so its not a thug on the street in Oakland buying one.

        We CAN buy and own semi-automatic variants in most states, although the obvious California, New York, etc. have significant restrictions and California banned them starting January 1.

      • Mr. Johnson, a slight amendment (no pun intended), in 1812 during the US’s INVASION of Canada, the US Army quartered troops in civilian’s homes 🏠 and required them to feed 🍳and provide for them 🛌.

        Ironic, no? 🙃

        When this was unnecessary, the US burned 🔥 the said homes, which was an actual Atrocity (War Crime ☠) at that time.

        But, Treaty of Ghent ✍ blah blah blah, friends again. 🍻

        😀

      • Greetings Bibi. Just figured that whilst you’re using “the mighty pistol” and a rapid-fire gun that is significantly harder to control, we are allowed the right to rifles with high power scopes and shotguns that are devestating at close range. Canadians can also owns pistols for collection and target shooting, but they can be used for self defense if you’re not an idiot about it.

  12. I was looking to customize the SKS with a bullpup stock, but some forums sugets that would be illegal.
    If I make DIY a bull-pup stock which would have with the sks over 660mm, it still would be illegal, or I still can use the SKS as non-restricted.

    Thank you.

    • The conversion would be prohibited – totally illegal. You can buy some bullpup rifles that were designed as bullpup rifles, but you cannot convert a rifle designed as a non-bullpup into a bullpup. (So you can buy a Kel Tec RFB, for instance, but you cannot put your 10/22 in an aftermarket or homemade bullpup stock)

  13. I have conflicting information and would like clarification, please.
    Is the Camp Carbine 45 acp (by various manufacturers) legal
    in Canada? I cannot find anywhere where it is listed…
    Than you,
    Larry Cuthbert

  14. C-68 is alive and well, blame PM Harper for not repealing it, if you possess a firearm in Canada, you re a potential criminal and felon, upon expiration of a paper licence, totally stupid and unconstitutional , remember we have no property rights in Canada

  15. I can’t stand our gun laws like i live in windsor Ontario and we have one gun shops that doesn’t have very much in it but you go 45 minutes across thr border and you can get aks and machine pistols i just hate this country were not free at all were more and more oppressed

    • Absolutely right my man. Let’s face it, guns save people.
      [as for the rest of the post…
      Yup, that's about it
      -Ed.]

      • “Absolutely right my man. Let’s face it, guns save people”

        Actually agree with your statement, There are more people saved with guns in the US than anywhere else in the world. The question should be, how many more mass shootings would there be without CCW and gun ownership and why are almost all the mass shootings happening at gun free zones?

      • That’s not a very sane or rational comparison. Los Angeles, CA has more population (by itself) than Canada, and compressed into about 200 square miles. Although, using your analogy, you would expect to see something like double the mass shootings in California each year as you do in all of Canada, because California has twice as many people as Canada, but you don’t. Despite California purchaser’s buying 1.5 million firearms last year, mostly AR-15s and handguns, we had 1 mass shooting – a declared husband & wife terrorist here on a K-1 Visa from Pakistan. If we hadn’t issued a visa, no mass shootings. Altogether, firearm deaths of more than 1 person (I don’t consider 2 or 3 to be a ‘mass shooting’ because they are usually a domestic murder/suicide thing, but including those about a dozen.

        Keep in mind, FBI mass shooting statistics also INCLUDE homicides by police – so they are not always criminal, in fact they usually are not. The vast majority are justifiable or law-enforcement.

        I’m happy to say I have rifles of all types, including AR’s, almost everything used in WWII, and a few hunting rifles, shotguns, and a couple of large caliber handguns. While I’m an avid hunter, I am also an avid sportsman.

        Do I hunt with the AR? No, of course not, it’s not even my most accurate rifle. I own one because it is America’s gun.. we designed it, we developed it in the field, and now we can buy the parts off the shelf and build our own for more challenge than just buying one at Walmart. It’s incredibly fun to shoot and is the most ‘enjoyable’ firearm I have. For quick home defense, I’d take my HighPointe carbine w/ a red-dot holographic scope every time, where that dot is, bullet hits. It’s the ultimate home defense and a .45 caliber has a lot of knock-down at close range. Do I need home defense? Not really, I live in one of the best neighborhoods in California, but with 22 trillion in debt, and a government that is basically bankrupt, we might see the fall of US government at some point, and high priced neighborhoods like mine are more likely targets for looting than the ghetto. Fortunately, the poor don’t have the funds to buy AR’s because I wouldn’t want to be down-range of one.

        My current challenge, figuring out what is actually legal vs what I own, to use in Canada for a hunting trip I’m planning in 2022.

        The most insulting nature of these comments though is some belief that myself or my wife with our $250,000 professional income are natural born killers and enemies of the state or something. Have you ever considered that people with means sometimes just have a hobby?

        Thank God for the Second Amendment… I’m not going to derail against our Canadian friends, you have often shared blood with us in the field, and as a former soldier, I share that bond with our brothers-in-arms. However, our histories are very different. Canada remained a British subject, where America was born in conflict. We cast off those shackles of colonization long ago, and our history, our culture, and our way of life was set in motion.

        Would we trade our freedoms for a few less shootings very year? No way. He who trades freedom for security, gets neither. Do we trust government? No we do not. Our Declaration of Independence declared that when governments are no longer just or act in the will of the people, they should be disbanded and new government instituted. You CANNOT do that as a free society, if the society is disarmed. Governments are made of people that get a paycheck, individually, no one is a danger to the others or our way of life, but collectively government will protect itself and those precious pensions. Do we fear this? of course not, but it only takes one tyrant…

        How Canada and Canadians choose to live, is completely up to you, but it is very condescending to judge how others choose to live.

        Should we ban Buick’s? We had some nut case in Las Vegas right before Christmas mow down a dozen people on the strip sidewalk with her car and her baby in the back seat because her baby daddy left her. Crazy people will do crazy things, a firearm is just not required for that, if one is not available, something else will be used.

      • Very well said Sir. Trust me when I say there are many Canadians who share your point of view. I’d like to point out the hypocrisy of our own Government selling 15 billion dollars in weapons to Saudi Arabia, at the same time telling Canadians we can’t be trusted with a semi auto rifle.

  16. i live in canada im thinking of geting my fireamrs licences and to buy a 303 leeinfiled bolt action rifle what licences woluld i need what cadagory would it be classied under what clip and how many round in the clip would be legal

    • A bolt action Lee Enfield (.303 British) rifle requires only a basic Firearms Licence.

      Assuming provided nobody has done something stupid & unlawful to it. Like making below legal length, or increasing its’ 10 cartridge magazine capacity.

      • Bolt Actions do not have a mazine limit. you can load a 25 shot mag in there if you wanted to.

      • Matthew, bizarrely enough, the Lee-Enfield is specifically mentioned in Section 3 (2) (ii) of SOR / 98-462 (page 20) with reference to being limited to ten (10) round magazines.

        But I could be wrong…

      • Well you can’t really increase the mag capacity of a Lee Enfield.. it holds 10 rounds… that’s it!… and who in their right mind wants to mess with a 10 round magazine?? It isn’t worth the effort! Just get more mags!

  17. Can someone who doesn’t have any legal permit to own a firearm still buy parts and/or accessories for firearms? I was told that only certain important and vital parts essential to a guns operation are what you really get licensed for. Such as firing pin, receiver, barrels etc.

    • The receiver or frame is considered be actual firearm and so the appropriate licence is required to own and/or aquire same.

      Parts that make a firearm Prohibited, like a 4″ pistol barrel, also require the appropriate licence as above, I believe.

      Some bits are simply Prohibited to own, example: an ammunition magazine, or outer shell of such a magazine, designed to hold more than the allowed number of cartridges or shells allowed.

      Other than that, I believe parts are just parts.

      NOT LEGAL ADVICE. I COULD BE WRONG. YMMV.

  18. ” a handgun designed or adapted to discharge 25 or 32 caliber ammunition”

    I think this is one of the stupider rules 🙁

  19. Forgive me if I sound dumb, but if the AK47 is a former prohibited weapon then I can own one in Canada? Swear you couldn’t.

    • ICBROC, but I believe the “Former” in the title refers to the Order, not the firearms listed in it.

  20. So my dad goes to upgrade his POL to a PAL today, and the guy tells him that as of June 16th it can no longer be done, and that they’re in the process of converting all of the existing POLs to PALs and the should send him his papers in3 months. Does anyone have any info on this?

    • No specific knowledge, but it’s part of the new ‘common sense’ firearm legislation. As well, your ATT becomes a condition of your restricted PAL. Attending the course now mandatory for first time PAL applicants… And the ability for ministers to overturn beautocrats poorly concieved weapons prohibitions….

      Honestly, doesn’t do much. But I guess it’s a place to start, assuming the gun grabbers don’t get back into power.

    • That is true my new PAL just arrived in the mail whereas up until a month ago all I had was a POL. I did not have to take a course etc. Seems like somebody in Gov. got a laxative and got their brains working.

  21. Mike says:

    April 16, 2015 at 10:39

    Are there types of shotguns that are prohibited? For instance a Remington 870 setup for home defense? I’m traveling into Canada soon and was informed that I can bring s firearm for protection against wildlife in a remote area. I want to make sure that the gun I bring is acceptable. Thanks for you help!

    Dave answers Mike: There are a few shotguns that are prohibited, but most prohibs are pretty rare (like the striker and the USAS-12) The only really well-known prohib shotgun is the the SPAS-12. Providing that you haven’t ‘modified’ the length of your shotgun (sawn it down), and its length meets certain minimum requirements (18″ barrel, 26″ overall), your 870 is good to go.

    • You may also buy & use legal aftermarket 870 pump bbls in 15″, 12.5″, and 8.5″ lengths and swap out your original bbl.
      Just make sure that the 26″+ length rule is followed.

      Also if you shot anybody in home defence, you WILL be arrested. Maybe not convicted, but surely arrested.

      • NOT LEGAL ADVICE !

      • Just read that if your pump shotgun left the factory with a barrel of 18.5″, and a second identical model one left the factory but with a 12.5″ barrel, both are Non-restricted.

        BUT, technically, if you swap-out the two, non-serialized, factory barrels between them, you have now – Shortened The First One Below Legal Barrel Length “By Any Other Means” – so it is Now Prohibited.

        (But, if the first one ‘Never Ever Had A Barrel Installed Before’, its’ all ok because no barrel ever installed on it was shortened by installing the 12.5″ barrel.)

        So if you buy a pump with a spare barrel, be sure to buy the factory 12.5″ one with the 18.5″ barrel as the spare, I guess.

        Any constructive comments?

        The above is, as always,
        NOT LEGAL ADVICE.

      • You heard right. Its screwy as hell but its true too.

  22. I’m so depressed now haha. I really wanted to get a firearm made by Heckler and Koch only to find out that every single firearm they make has been prohibited since 1995 except the 416 and the 417. Sigh. Why would MP5 variants be Prohibited? They only shoot 9mm. Is it because there’s no way to modify it to semi auto?

    GASP! I don’t see any G36 variants on the list. There still maybe be hope 😀

    • You can buy a bunch of different HK stuff. You can buy all the pistols, providing they meet the 4 1/2 barrel requirement. You can also get a HK USC – which is the civvy version of the UMP. The USC will be restricted (range-only) by barrel length. However, you can put a longer barrel in your USC and then it becomes non-restricted. You can also get an SL8 (non-restricted), which several owners have restocked and dressed up to closely resemble its cousin the G36.

    • Got a 12(6) RPAL ?

  23. So I assume these soviet SKS rifles that Canadian tire are selling are legal but is this one that they are trying to make restricted? I have heard it is one they are considering.

  24. So ok I’m more confused now then ever, especially with the M16 and any variant? So is it to say any M/AR type platform is illegal? Say like AR-15 rifles of any type since they are all just a semi auto variant of the original M16 rifles?? I mean our daughter wants us to move to Canada because her best friend lives there.. I’m going to list pretty much all of my firearms so maybe someone can say as of right now which I could take and which ones I shouldn’t take versus those I definitely cannot take??

    Rifles
    DPMS Panther LR-308AP4 AR platform .308 long range semi auto rifle
    Olympic Arms CAR-97/M4 Carbine .223/5.56
    Custom built Long Range .223/5.56 Carbine Side Charge Semi Auto AR Rifle
    Ruger 10-22 .22LR
    GS5-22 H&K MP5 .22LR Clone
    Remington 742 Woodsmaster Semi Auto 30:06 Rifle
    Davey Cricket .22LR bolt action kids rifle
    Henry Big Boy Lever Action Repeating Rifle
    Handguns
    American Arms .22LR/22 Magnum SA Revolver
    Ruger Vaquero .45LC Revolver
    Sig Sauer Mosquito .22LR Pistol
    Glock 23 3Rd Gen .40 Cal
    Smith & Wesson 6906 9MM pistol
    Springfield Armory XD45 Service Model
    Kimber PRO Carry II .45 Auto stainless
    Kimber Pro Carry II .45 Auto Black/slate
    Para Ordnance Blackwatch Companion LDA CCO .45 Auto
    Sig Sauer Z1911 Zombie Hunter .45 Auto

    That’s most of them that I can think of off the top of my head? I know there’s a couple more I am not remembering right now but that’s most of them. On some models maybe barrel length might make them restricted or prohibited? Or am I wrong? We though about moving to Canada before but haven’t made plans of late.. Anyway tell me what you think I mean I wouldn’t let my gun collection prohibit me from moving if it’s something I had to do but ideally wouldn’t want to get rid of part of my collection either in smal part or large part if I can avoid it? But I know all my firearms here are perfectly legal… Another concern I have is would I have problems bringing my stock of ammo into Canada with me? I have maybe 5500 to 6500 rounds of assorted ammo
    .22LR/.22MAG FMJ and Hollow point and lead tip
    .223 lead tip and ballistic tip and hollow points
    5.56mm military surplus ammo
    .308 military long range ammo and lead tip and hollow point with ballistic tips
    30:06 coreloct
    9MM FMJ and JHP
    .40 cal FMJ JHP
    .45 Long Colt SJHP JHP Lead FN/R
    .45 Auto FMJ JHP
    .44 Mag SJHP LRN JHP

    I have a couple other caliber I’m sure I am forgetting and even in some US states some of my ammo is prohibited but not where we live now neither is the amount of ammo we keep on hand but Canada and other countries might have different laws and restrictions so I do not know so any help would be appreciated

    Thanks
    Bill

    • I am a Canadian gun guy – and I’ll explain it as best I can.

      Non-restricted – means a hunting gun you can use many places
      Restricted – means a range-only gun
      Prohibited – means no one (or almost no one) can have it.

      ARs and derivatives are restricted, so range-only. Handguns with barrels of less than 4 1/4″ are prohibited – so that means all your snub-nosed revolvers and mini-glocks. (Note that one can still buy the mini-glocks, so long as you put a 4 1/2 barrel in that glock) There is also a long list of firearms that are prohibited by name – these are mainly military rifles. An AK is prohibited, for instance. Also prohibited as guns that are deemed ‘variants’ of prohibited rifles. Your GSG MP5, for example, is prohibited as a variant (yes, really) of the prohibited MP5.

      Send me an email if you want more info.

      • Are there types of shotguns that are prohibited? For instance a Remington 870 setup for home defense? I’m traveling into Canada soon and was informed that I can bring s firearm for protection against wildlife in a remote area. I want to make sure that the gun I bring is acceptable. Thanks for you help!

      • Can I bring a “Mossberg 930 SPX Semiautomatic” 12 guage shotgun to Canada?
        I’m transiting up to Alaska soon by private vehicle.

      • Just called the Canadian Gun Police Immigration people at 1 (506) 624-6626. They told me that I CAN bring my Mossberg 930 Shotgun as long as I have the Non Resident Firearms Declaration form with me, the gun is locked up, and pay the $25 fee.

      • For the most part, you’ve got it right, BUT: because the 930 is a semi-auto and centerfire, if the tube mag can hold more than 5 rounds, it’s a “prohibited weapon” and that changes things considerably.

      • Barrel length must be greater than 105mm or 4.13 inches. To be more specific.

    • With regard other limits, you may not import nor have more than 225 kg (~498 lbs) of ‘small arms’ ammunition in your home without special conditions.

      This is about 13,000+ rounds of 7.62×39, for example.

      YMMV

      (Not legal advice, as always)

  25. You can tell that the politicians and bureaucrats that drafted this legislation did not have any facts statistics or any logical reasons to ban these weapons in Canada. They most likely looked at pictures and based solely on the often misused term assault rifle added these weapons to the list. How else do you explain the G-11 being banned in Canada it was a mere prototype weapon from Germany and was never produced beyond a couple of rifles for testing. And the Ruger Mini 14 which was used in the only mass shooting in Canada is non restricted.

  26. Is the “American 180” or any variet illegal in Canada?

  27. […] constitutes the three is rather convoluted, so I will link you to a site that explains what is what. Just note that the Canadians make California look reasonable—enough […]

  28. Funny have not banned/restricted smokes or booze, bigger killers with no reregistration….just sayin

  29. now with this being said and with your optimistic outlook on possibilities of more banning of firearms at any time, can I safely assume that any 50 caliber longe range rifle, say the McMillan tac 50 is prohibited? or would all mcmillans tac rifles be prohibited and not just the 50 cals?

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