Bill C-19

Apr 052012
 

Canada’s Long Gun Registration Ends

National Firearms Association

Bill C-19, the Conservative Government’s bill ending the registration of non-restricted long guns was passed by the Canadian Senate Wednesday by a vote of 50 to 27.  Two Liberal Senators voted for Bill C-19, one Progressive Conservative Senator voted against it.

On Thursday April 5, 2012, Bill C-19 was signed by Governor General David Johnston and received Royal Assent.  Now the bill is law and will need to be enacted.  The Quebec government has filed an injunction to obtain the federal registration records to set up its own registration system.  However, despite what Quebec does, Canada’s long experiment with universal firearms registration has ended. Continue reading »

Feb 152012
 

C-19 passes third reading 159-130

Just pick one and read away.  I’m gonna go have me a cold one now.

CHEERS!

Next stop: kill the PAL.

Jan 102012
 

A little clarity, if you please

National Firearms Association

“Gun owners who fail to keep their papers in order are still treated as criminals.”

In December, the Conservative Party launched an ad campaign targeting the pocketbooks of law abiding gun owners by extolling the virtues of the government’s Bill C-19, the legislation they introduced scrapping the long-gun registry.  The ad proudly stated, “Now hunters and farmers won’t be treated as criminals anymore.”

“Yes they will,” exclaimed Sheldon Clare, President of the National Firearms Association. “The government’s own reports show that there are over 600,000 Made-in-Ottawa paper criminals whose only “crime” is not to keep ahead of the red tape imposed by the Liberal’s Bill C-68, the Firearms Act, he explained.  “This number includes 337,993 expired firearms license holders and 288,527 individuals who have still not re-registered all of their restricted and/or prohibited firearms.  There are millions more formerly law-abiding gun owners who forgot or refused to licence themselves when the Liberals rammed Bill C-68 through Parliament in 1995.  The Liberal Firearms Act made them instant paper criminals.  The Conservative Government’s Bill C-19 won’t correct this injustice.” Continue reading »

Dec 082011
 

End of gun registry in sight

by Les MacPherson
Regina Leader-Post

I can only guffaw at the bitter-enders who are trying to thwart Parliament and forever preserve the long-gun registry, like Lenin in his tomb.

It’s not going to happen. On the strength of ridiculous technicalities, they are trying to stop the sun from going down.

Before we go on, let’s clear up some terminology. The so-called database that bitter-enders want to preserve is the registry by another name. Whatever you call it, this is the record, compiled under threat of criminal prosecution, of shotguns and rifles owned by Canadian farmers, duck hunters and target shooters. Stephen Harper’s majority Conservative government campaigned on a very clear promise to abolish this registry. Continue reading »

Nov 222011
 

Unpublished Lott-Mauser Letter

Funny, isn’t it, how some stuff just never seems to get published in the ever-so-informative MSM?  What with all the hullabaloo lately over C-19, you’d think this would be relevant or something…

Go figure.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Despite spending a whooping $2.7 billion on creating and running a long gun registry, Canadians still have not reaped any benefits.  Even though the registry started registering long guns in 1998, it has yet to solve one single murder. Instead it has been an enormous waste of police officers’ time, diverting their efforts from patrolling Canadian streets and doing traditional policing activities. As parliament debates whether to eliminate the long gun registry, safety should be the real concern.

Control advocates have long claimed that registration was a safety issue, and the reasoning was straightforward: If a gun had been left at a crime scene and it was registered to the person who committed the crime, the registry would link the crime gun back to the criminal.

Nice logic, but reality does not work that way.  Crime guns are very rarely left at the crime scene, and when they are left at the scene criminals are not stupid enough to register their guns.  Even in the few cases where crime guns are left at the scene it is usually because criminals have either been seriously injured or killed, so these crimes will be solved even without registration. Continue reading »

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